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and Students Since 1994

Art of Japan - Kimonos

Submitted by: Meryl Weber, Art Coordinator for Berkeley County School District
UNIT: Art of Japan - Textiles - Kimonos
Grade Level: Elementary (clay Kimonos adaptable to middle school)

Kimono Weavings | Kimono Scratch Art | Kimono Clay Sculpture

 

Meryl was a recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship to Japan. These lessons were a result of her trip. Many members of Getty TeacherArtExchange list serve have found out about this program through the list. Meryl is sharing her experience. Lessons were done with students at Hanahan Elementary in Hanahan, South Carolina.

 

Lesson Title: Kimono Paper Weavings

 

Grade 3

Description: The Kimono is the traditional dress of Japan.  They are made of beautiful fabrics and are very expensive to buy. Different styles of Kimono are worn by married and unmarried women and during different seasons of the year. Today Kimono are worn for special occasions only.

 

Objectives:

  • Students review elements and principles of design that apply to this project –Repeat pattern.

  • Students gain skills in the concept of weaving.

  • Students compare US and Japanese clothing.

1 2  

Materials:

Assorted Construction Paper. 12"X18" (30.5 x 46 cm)
Pieces of paper cut into ½ " (1.3 cm) strips or: Metallic Foil Paper., and if you want your project to be reversible, Thai Reversible Paper..
6" x 6" (15 x 15 cm) Origami Paper Assortment. cut in half to 3" x 6" (7.6 x 15 cm) pieces
Elmer's Glue., Scissors.

 

Resources:

Example of a Kimono or doll wearing a Kimono, images of Kimono

Websites:

Horn, Diane Victoria. Japanese Kimono Designs,. Owings Mills, MD: Stemmer House, 1991.

 

Directions:

DAY 1. Show examples of Kimono and internet resources. (See above in Resources) Talk about the different fibers (silk, wool, cotton, linen) and where they come from.  Have students examine their shirts to see if they are knitted or woven. Compare Kimono to American clothing. Define loom. Demonstrate how to make the "loom". There will actually be 2 loom areas cut. The top half of the Kimono is woven first then the bottom half is folded up and cut to create another "loom."

 

1. Hold paper vertically. Fold in half vertically, open and fold again horizontally. Open and fold long edges of paper so that they meet in the middle. Paper is divided into 1/8ths. Cut away the shaded areas to form a Kimono shape. Fold the top edge down to the center. Draw lines about 1 inch apart and cut to form the loom.

 

1    2   3  4

DAY 2- Demonstrate how to weave the paper strips. Weave the top half of the Kimono. Use color strips to create a repeating pattern.

 

DAY 3-6- Continue weaving top half. When finished, fold and cut the bottom half. Weave the bottom.

 

DAY 3- When weaving is complete use origami paper to add details (obi, collar)

 

Assessment:
Woven Paper Kimono

 

Demonstrated repeating pattern

1

2

3

4

Used care/skill weaving

1

2

3

4

Added original details

1

2

3

4

Total_________ Grade_______

 

 

 

 

 

National Standards:
I. Understanding And Applying Media, Techniques, And Processes

III. Choosing And Evaluating A Range Of Subject Matter, Symbols, And Ideas

IV. Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures.

 

5       6       7

 

Title: Kimono Scratch Art

Grade 4

 

Description:

The Kimono is the traditional dress of Japan. They are made of beautiful fabrics and are very expensive to buy. Different styles of Kimono are worn by married and unmarried women and during different seasons of the year. Today Kimono are worn for special occasions only. The designs on the Kimono are created using many techniques (batik, shibori, weaving).  Many artists today use the image of Kimono in their own artwork.

 

Objectives:

  • Students review elements and principles of design that apply to this project –pattern, negative/positive.

  • Students gain skills in observational drawing.

  • Compare the designs of images of Kimono.

Materials:

Rainbow White Scratch paper. 9" X 12" (23 x 30.5 cm)
Wooden stylus
Silk Flowers
White Copy paper,. Drawing Pencils.

Note: this lesson would also be stunning on Gold or Silver Scratchboard..

 

Resources:

Example of a Kimono (See Resources above) or Kimono Doll,. images of Kimono.

 

Websites:

Horn, Diane Victoria. Japanese Kimono Designs,. Owings Mills, MD: Stemmer House, 1991.

 

Directions:

DAY - Show examples of Kimono and internet resources.  Discuss the image of Kimono as art. Show examples of nature designs on Kimono. Students sketch 3 different silk flowers.

DAY 2- Students draw a simple outline of a Kimono.  Use drawings of flowers to design the Kimono pattern.

DAY 3 - 6-  Transfer Kimono design to Rainbow White Scratch paper.. Place sketch on paper and trace over lines with a ball point pen. Impression of lines will come out on Scratch–Art paper.  Use wooden stylus to scratch away the design. Make decisions as to which areas with remain white, which will be solid color and which will have pattern.

 

Assessment:
Scratchboard Kimono

 

Kimono design showed balance

1

2

3

4

Color and white areas  (notan) 

1

2

3

4

Used at least 3 line textures/patterns

1

2

3

4

Skill of 3 observational drawings

1

2

3

4

Total_________ Grade_______

 

 

 

 

 

National Standards:

I. Understanding And Applying Media, Techniques, And Processes

III. Choosing And Evaluating A Range Of Subject Matter, Symbols, And Ideas

IV. Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures

 

8       9       10

 

Title: Clay Kimono

Grade 5

 

Description:

The Kimono is the traditional dress of Japan. They are made of beautiful fabrics and are very expensive to buy. Different styles of Kimono are worn by married and unmarried women and during different seasons of the year. Today Kimono are worn for special occasions only. The designs on the Kimono are created using many techniques (batik, shibori, weaving). Many artists today use the image of Kimono in their own artwork.

 

Objectives:

  • Students review elements and principles of design that apply to this project –pattern, texture, color.

  • Students gain skill in slab building clay forms.

Materials:

White Amaco Buff Clay. ½ lb (227 g) per student
Rolling Pins., Wire End Clay Tool Set. or Clay Modeling Tools.
Cardboard cones, 8" (20 cm) high, covered with a plastic sandwich bag
Objects to create texture: buttons, lace, etc
Black Acrylic Paint., Metallic Acrylics.
Wood bases. (You can make your own to save money), Liquid Nails Adhesive.
Glazes.

Note: these would also be beautiful underglazed and glazed.

 

Resources:

Example of a clay Kimono

 

Websites:

Horn, Diane Victoria. Japanese Kimono Designs,. Owings Mills, MD: Stemmer House, 1991.

Directions:

DAY 1.

Show examples of Kimono and internet resources. Discuss the image of Kimono as art. Show examples of nature designs on Kimono. Review clay techniques and procedures.

DAY 2-3.

Students roll out clay to 3/8 inch thickness, use cutting tool to cut out an oval about 8 inches long. Cut a small circle in the center. Drape clay over plastic covered cardboard cones. Score and attach under the sleeves. Roll out a thin coil and attach around the neck. Press objects into clay for pattern and texture. Dry for one day and remove plastic bag from cone. Replace Kimono on cone until dry.

DAY 3-5.

Fire clay in Kiln.. Paint Kimono a solid color. When dry rub Metallic Acrylics. to bring out textures. Mount on wood base using Liquid Nails adhesive.

 

Assessment:

Clay Kimono

 

Creative, interesting

1

2

3

4

Balanced design

1

2

3

4

Used care/skill ceramic construction

1

2

3

4

Pasting

1

2

3

4

Use of paint 

1

2

3

4

Total_________ Grade_______

 

 

 

 

 

National Standards:

I. Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes

III. Choosing and Evaluating A Range Of Subject Matter, Symbols, And Ideas

IV. Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures.

 

"Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program"

The Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program (JFMF) provides U.S. primary and secondary school teachers and administrators with the opportunity to participate in three-week study visits to Japan and to return home with a follow-on plan designed to introduce Japanese culture to American students. Each year, up to 600 teachers and administrators, including participants from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, are selected to participate in the JFMF program. The JFMF Program features an orientation to Japan followed by visits to primary and secondary schools, teacher training colleges, cultural sites, and industrial facilities. Meetings with Japanese teachers and students and a home stay with a Japanese family are also key components of the program.

Participants return home to share their new knowledge with students, colleagues, and the local community, ensuring that more than just the individual participants profit from the experience. As an additional benefit to participants, graduate level credits are also available. Check site for deadlines.

 

 


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