Serving Art Educators
and Students Since 1994


 

Rubric For Grading Art

100  95  90%
|------------|
        A
Excellent
Outstanding
Exemplary

89   85   80%
|------------|
        B
Above Average
Very Good
Acceptable

79   75   70%
|------------|
        C
Average
Good
Not Yet Acceptable

69   65   60%
|------------|
        D
Below Average
Needs Improvement
Barely Acceptable

59% and below
|------------|
        F
Unsatisfactory
Poor
Unacceptable


ELEMENTS OF DESIGN: LINE, TEXTURE, COLOR, SHAPE/FORM, VALUE, SPACE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN: REPETITION, BALANCE, EMPHASIS, CONTRAST, UNITY

A:  Planned carefully, made several sketches, and showed an awareness of the elements and principles of design; chose color scheme carefully, used space effectively.

B: The artwork shows that the student applied the principles of design while using one or more elements effectively; showed an awareness of filling the space adequately.

C: The student did the assignment adequately, yet it shows lack of planning and little evidence that an overall composition was planned.

D: The assignment was completed and turned in, but showed little evidence of any understanding of the elements and principles of art; no evidence of planning.

F: The student did the minimum or the artwork was never completed.

 

Creativity/Originality

A: The student explored several choices before selecting one; generating many ideas; tried unusual combinations or changes on several ideas; made connections to previous knowledge; demonstrated understanding problem solving skills.

B: The student tried a few ideas for selecting one; or based his or her work on someone else's idea; made decisions after referring to one source; solve the problem in logical way.

C: The student tried in idea, and help out adequately, but it lacked originality; substituted "symbols" for personal observation; might have copied work.

D: The student fulfill the assignment, but gave no evidence of trying anything unusual.

F: The student showed no evidence of original thought.

 

Effort/Perseverance

A: The project was continued until it was complete as the student could make it; gave it effort far beyond that required; to pride in going well beyond the requirement.

B: The student work hard and completed the project, but with a loom or effort it might have been outstanding.

C: The student finished the project, but it could have been improved with more effort; adequate interpretation of the assignment, but lacking finish; chose an easy project and did it indifferently.

D: The project was completed with minimum effort.

F: The student did not finished the work adequately.

 

Craftsmanship/Skill/Consistency

A: The artwork was beautiful and patiently done; it was as good as hard work could make it.

B: With a little more effort, the work could have been outstanding; lacks the finishing touches.

C: The student showed average craftsmanship; adequate, but not as good as it could have been, a bit careless.

D: The student showed below average craftsmanship, lack of pride in finished work.

F: The student showed poor craftsmanship; evidence of lazy this or lack of understanding.

 

Group Cooperation/Attitude

A: The student work toward group goals, effectively performed a variety of roles in group work, followed through on commitments, was sensitive to the feelings and knowledge level of others, willingly participated in necessary preparation or work for classroom.

B: The student participated enthusiastically, followed through with commitments, performed more than adequately, assisted in preparation and clean-up.

C: The student mostly allowed others in the group to make all the decisions, did his or her share of work adequately, assisted in preparation and cleanup when asked.

D: The student allowed others to do most of the work, did participate minimally, did the minimum amount.

F: The student was part of the group, but did almost nothing toward group goals, did a minimal amount of preparation and cleanup.

Sample Art Rubric

To print these rubrics on 8.5" X 11" (21.5 x 28 cm) paper, click here.

Following are two rubrics. You can also right-click on the rubrics below and save to your computer

Rubric Submitted by Marianne Galyk

 

rubric #1

 

Form adapted using criteria submitted by Patty Knott (see note below)

 

rubric #2

 

Note from Patty Knott

I often make entirely original rubrics, this one is borrowed from  many sources. I think some of this may have come from Marvin Bartel. The important thing in designing rubrics is that YOU believe what you are evaluating is important and you consider what the students think is important. Rubrics are a collaboration between student and teacher. A student needs to know what good or excellent "looks like " as compared to an average. With each rubric I also give reflection questions. I ask them to write about the work of another student and really question them selves as to why they respond to this work. They assign adjectives to the work -- they tell how they are "moved."  I also ask with each work  "what do you want me to consider in evaluating what you did?" Most often the answer is effort or experimenting.  And that is why composition and technique do not hold higher regard from investigating and problem solving.

 

I offer the "5" column so if a student can justify that he/she went beyond presumed expectations, I will bump up in that category. I always expect that a student will go beyond in some way that I didn't anticipate.

I've been using rubrics long before they became the thing to do.  I never knew any other way to evaluate art work. My numbers are qualified beyond good and excellent, etc. They need to know what good is. It's the only way rubrics work. I don't ever just check off boxes, I make lots of comments.

My grading has become much easier since I initiated daily objective logs.  I make a weekly sheet for each student  to complete.  They enter their objectives for the day at the beginning of the period and reflect on progress at the end.  I read these each day and make brief comments. This is also a way for the students to ask me questions  when I don't get around to see each one during the period.  Since this takes care of attendance, I just spend the time reviewing rather than taking roll.   It allows me to give individual prompts.  I have established it as routine, so it's not a big chore. The kids expect it and it keeps them on task.

I think kids understand and want honest evaluations. They too often underestimate what they have done, and, will admit when they slack. Work with them to make the dialogue and always understand that sometimes they deviate for a reason. ~ Patty Knott


Rubrics by Marianne Galyk

Rubric Submitted by Marianne Galyk

 

Assessment Rubric

Student Name:

Class Period:

Assignment:

Date Completed:


Circle the number in pencil that best shows how well you feel that you completed that criterion for the assignment.

Excellent

Good

Average

Needs Improvement

Rate Yourself

Teacher’s Rating

Criteria 1 –

10

9 – 8

7

6 or less

   

Criteria 2 –

10

9 – 8

7

6 or less

   

Criteria 3 –

10

9 – 8

7

6 or less

   

Criteria

4

– Effort: took time to develop idea & complete project? (Didn’t rush.) Good use of class time?

10

9 – 8

7

6 or less

   

Criteria 5 – Craftsmanship – Neat, clean & complete? Skillful use of the art tools & media?

10

9 – 8

7

6 or less

   

Total: 50
x 2 = 100
(possible points)

Grade:

       

Your Total

Teacher Total

 

Student Comments:

 

Teacher Comments:


Assessment Rubric

Student Name:

Class Period:

Assignment/Problem:

Date Completed:

Circle the number in pencil that best shows how well you feel that you completed that criterion for the assignment.

Superior
Justify below

Excellent

Good

Average

Needs Improvement

Rate Yourself

Teacher’s Rating

Composition and design -- does it read well?

5

4

3

2

1

   

Growth and progress -- How does the work compare to previous work? Is there growth in thought?

5

4

3

2

1

   

Impact -- Is it daring? Does it extend from past work? Is it a theme of personal expression or if "borrowed' how did you change it?

5

4

3

2

1

   

The problem -- Is the student addressing the problem posed? Are variations made for a reason?

5

4

3

2

1

   
Care/effort -- Is the work appropriate to the style? attention to details -- craftsmanship

5

4

3

2

1

   
Work habits - efficient use of time, asking questions,
recording thoughts, experimenting
5

4

3 2 1    

Grade:

 

Your Total

Teacher Total

 

Student Reflection:

 

Teacher's Comments:

 




 


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